Untitled

ryanpotterswag:

Supah Ninjas:

manhuntnet:Flashback Friday: Kept After School

pixelsordeath:

The year was 1996. Bill Clinton was just finishing his first term as President. I was oohing and aaahing over the brand new Nintendo 64, and the equally impressive Super Mario 64. Starcraft was still a year away. And development began on Duke Nukem Forever.

15 years, 2 United States Presidents,…

fuckyeahdavidfosterwallace:thenotes:Mark Leyner /// Et Tu, BabeLeyner’s prose quietly becomes the crux of David Foster Wallace’s hand-wringing in “E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction”—a radioactive stew of adspeak and holographic juxtapositions; of violence, celebrity, pop psychology and punchlines. A style, in other words, that imitates disinterested channel-surfing. To Wallace, Leyner’s willingness to have his voice deformed by a televisual influence even as he maintains an alarming postmodern earnestness in the face of such hyperkinetic absurdities undercuts his satire, because TV is already self-aware in a much tidier way. Which leaves Leyner “dead on the page” even as he racks up scene after diabolically funny scene, lampooning a form of entertainment that efficiently lampoons itself. But DFW annoyingly pussyfooted around two things: 1) how a full immersion in Leyner’s pyrotechnics leaves us (impressively) vulnerable to heartbreak at the description of impossible events, like people who cry at commercials, and 2) that television is not unique in presenting a grammar that prose would best avoid, and further, that any one medium’s appropriation of another’s syntax is a doomed enterprise. Leyner only falls short of cathode-ray saturation the way Mad Men falls short of the novelistic mastery it aspires to; the former is hindered by pages, the latter by the absence of same.     I always enjoy your posts, notes. I also really like that particular DFW essay, but I haven

fuckyeahdavidfosterwallace:

thenotes:

Mark Leyner /// Et Tu, Babe

Leyner’s prose quietly becomes the crux of David Foster Wallace’s hand-wringing in “E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction”—a radioactive stew of adspeak and holographic juxtapositions; of violence, celebrity, pop psychology and punchlines. A style, in other words, that imitates disinterested channel-surfing. To Wallace, Leyner’s willingness to have his voice deformed by a televisual influence even as he maintains an alarming postmodern earnestness in the face of such hyperkinetic absurdities undercuts his satire, because TV is already self-aware in a much tidier way. Which leaves Leyner “dead on the page” even as he racks up scene after diabolically funny scene, lampooning a form of entertainment that efficiently lampoons itself. But DFW annoyingly pussyfooted around two things: 1) how a full immersion in Leyner’s pyrotechnics leaves us (impressively) vulnerable to heartbreak at the description of impossible events, like people who cry at commercials, and 2) that television is not unique in presenting a grammar that prose would best avoid, and further, that any one medium’s appropriation of another’s syntax is a doomed enterprise. Leyner only falls short of cathode-ray saturation the way Mad Men falls short of the novelistic mastery it aspires to; the former is hindered by pages, the latter by the absence of same.     

I always enjoy your posts, notes. I also really like that particular DFW essay, but I haven

smktty:“ME3 has the worst plot and dialogue of the series, extremely low enemy and combat variety, obnoxious grinding, little character focus, cakewalk difficulty, extremely narrow dialogue choices, and a complete lack of exploration. When people say “the game was good up until the ending” and “aside from the ending, it was the best game in the series”, it makes me want to scream my lungs out”

smktty:

“ME3 has the worst plot and dialogue of the series, extremely low enemy and combat variety, obnoxious grinding, little character focus, cakewalk difficulty, extremely narrow dialogue choices, and a complete lack of exploration. When people say “the game was good up until the ending” and “aside from the ending, it was the best game in the series”, it makes me want to scream my lungs out”

nomatch4me:Randy Orton watchesWWE Supershow, MSG, 3/18/12

nomatch4me:

Randy Orton watches

WWE Supershow, MSG, 3/18/12

mirisha:THANKS FOR THE GOOP IN MY EAR, SPITTER.(Avi as Spitter, Bonk as Ellis, myself as Nick, photo by Gatsby.)

mirisha:

THANKS FOR THE GOOP IN MY EAR, SPITTER.

(Avi as Spitter, Bonk as Ellis, myself as Nick, photo by Gatsby.)

huhwhatandwhere:

Elaquent - The Scenic Route (OUT WORLDWIDE)

manicfame:

can i just say whoever made this is a genius.
nikki sixx= syn gates.
syn gates = nikki sixx.
i have thought this since the first time i saw him in bat country.